Oak Hill History

Oak Hill United Methodist Church has been worshipping, studying, and serving since 1844. The church began as an outreach of Washington Baptist Church in Pelzer, and was first known as Bethesda Methodist Church. A dramatic event occurred March 13, 1932 when the church sanctuary burned during Sunday services. Though the building was a total loss, much of the furnishings were salvaged. The church met in a local school for nearly a year until a new sanctuary was completed. Very shortly afterward Sunday School rooms and a basement with additional class room space were added. In the early years the church was part of multi-point charges- for many years holding Sunday School weekly while worship only once each month.

When Oak Hill became part of a two point charge with Pisgah Methodist Church the church members recognized the need for a parsonage to house its ministers. Using land donated by a church member, the church borrowed money for the first time in its history to construct the house completing it in 1958. In 1973, the men of the church built a large block fellowship hall with fireplace beside the church. The next significant construction project for the church was a major addition and renovation to the parsonage in 1987.

In recent years the church has frequently been on a two point charge with Pisgah United Methodist Church. More importantly, it has developed a reputation for outreach missions to the community and genuine warmth. Our prayer is that others will join us as we serve the least, the last, and reach the lost with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

HISTORY OF THE CROSS AND FLAME

The cross and flame logo was adopted after the United Methodist Church was formed in 1968 by merging the former Methodist Church and Evangelical United Brethren Church.  It has the following meaning.  The cross is from the centrality of the cross for the Christian life.  The two flames with a common base reflect the merger of the two churches to create the merged church.  Additionally, fire has traditionally been used to represent the power and work of the Holy Spirit.

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